Opinion: A constitutional convention would be bad for business

By Laura McDonnell



A convention such as this would most certainly attract well-funded organizations from outside Alaska.

Every 10 years (at least) Alaskans are asked to vote on whether a constitutional convention should be called. Each time throughout history voters have overwhelmingly voted this convention down. Unlike an amendment, a constitutional convention would leave our entire constitution up for amendment simultaneously, creating massive vulnerabilities to the precedents of our governance that have been in place since the beginning of Alaska’s statehood. A convention such as this would most certainly attract well-funded organizations from outside Alaska, with radical special interest groups paying for outcomes serving their outside agendas, rather than the best future for Alaskans. With the current discussions ongoing in pursuit of a constitutional convention, some of our most treasured institutions are at risk of drastic transformation and funding elimination. Personal use hunting and fishing, public schools, the ferry system, and Alaska’s constitutional right to privacy are just a few examples of what could potentially be taken from Alaskans, drastically impacting our cherished way of life here in the greatest state.

Read more at the Juneau Empire.